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Emergency Contact Numbers

During normal hours, call:

02920 621 511

Heath Vets Rhiwbina Surgery: 123-5 Heol-Y-Deri, Rhiwbina, Cardiff CF14 6UH

Outside normal hours, call: 02920 529 446

V.E.T.S. Emergency Clinic: 180/182 Merthyr Road, Whitchurch, Cardiff CF14 1DL

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Prevention of infectious disease is a very important part of this strategy in pets as well as people.

One of the main reasons that our pets live longer and healthier lives now than they did 30 years ago is the success of mass vaccination in reducing outbreaks of debilitating and often fatal infectious disease.

Vaccinations should be given every year to maintain the pet’s immunity, until there is clear evidence of less frequent requirements. As part of our commitment to your pet’s health, we have a reminder system to notify you when the booster is due.

We know that in some animals, the immunity to some diseases provided by vaccination lasts longer than 12 months. However, we do not know which individuals these are. There is no reliable evidence of any significant adverse effects of vaccination, so until we are able easily to detect who is immune, it is safer to give booster vaccinations at the recommended yearly intervals to all patients.

Vaccines protect against Distemper (“hardpad”) Infectious Hepatitis, Parvovirus, ParaInfluenza Virus and Leptospirosis.

Puppies

Two doses of vaccines are given, usually at 8 and 12 weeks of age (not younger). Adult dogs should have a booster vaccination every twelve months.

Kennel Cough

If your dog will be staying in a boarding kennels, or going to many dog shows, innoculation against Infectious Bronchitis (“Kennel Cough”) is also worthwhile. This is done by the vet administering a dose of nose drops. It mist be given at least 5 days before kennelling.

Dogs which travel abroad on the Pet Travel Scheme will require vaccination against rabies at the prescribed intervals (it varies from annually to every three years, depending on the vaccine used).

Cats

Routine vaccinations protect against two cat-flu viruses (herpes- and calici-virus), Feline Infectious Enteritis, and Feline Leukaemia Virus.

Cats which travel abroad on the Pet Travel Scheme will require vaccination against rabies at the prescribed intervals (it varies from annually to every three years, depending on the vaccine used).

Two doses of vaccine are given, usually at 9 and 12 weeks of age (not younger). Adult cats should have a booster vaccination every twelve months.

Click here for information about Myxomatosis & Viral Haemorrhagic Disease Of Rabbits

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